Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

MIS Joint Replacement offers important advantages, requiring smaller incisions and potentially causing less trauma, shorter hospital stay, faster recovery and less scarring than traditional techniques.

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Partial Knee Resurfacing

Partial knee resurfacing (PKR) is a surgical procedure for relieving arthritis in one compartment of the knee. With PKR, only the damaged surface of the knee joint is replaced, helping to minimize trauma to healthy bone and tissue.

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Rotator Cuff Repair

A rotator cuff tear is a common cause of pain and disability among adults. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means that many daily activities, like combing your hair or getting dressed, may become painful and difficult to do.

Learn more about Rotator Cuff Repair »

Shoulder Arthroscopy FAQ

You adore the outdoors and love to spend a Saturday afternoon on the tennis court winning your singles match, but throughout the years, you’ve noticed that your serve is losing its velocity and that your shoulder is beginning to stiffen and ache. If you are experiencing similar symptoms, you might want to speak with Dr. Jon G. McLennan about shoulder arthroscopy.

  1. What is Shoulder Arthroscopy?
  2. Is Shoulder Arthroscopy the right procedure for you?
  3. What is shoulder instability and how can shoulder arthroscopy help?
  4. What is a rotator cuff tear and can shoulder arthroscopy help?
  5. What steps should be taken prior to surgery?


1. What is Shoulder Arthroscopy?

Performed since the 1970s, arthroscopy is a commonly used procedure by orthopaedic surgeons to evaluate and repair problems within a joint. The process begins with Dr. McLennan inserting the arthroscope (small camera) into your shoulder joint. The camera will feed real time images on a small television monitor that the surgeon will utilize to guide surgical tools during the operation.

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2. Is Shoulder Arthroscopy the right procedure for you?

Over time, wear and tear caused by over-use and injury may cause inflammation. To ease the pain of everyday activities caused by shoulder instability or rotator cuff tears, the following procedures may be right for you:

  • Rotator Cuff Repair
  • Bone Spur Removal
  • Removal or Repair of the Labrum
  • Repair of Ligaments
  • Removal of Inflamed Tissue or Loose Cartilage
  • Repair for Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation

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3. What is shoulder instability and how can shoulder arthroscopy help?

You've heard the phrase "practice makes perfect," but over-use or injury may cause your shoulder to begin to ache in pain and hang lifeless. Chances are you may have injured your rotator cuff or even partially dislocated the shoulder.

Shoulder instability occurs when the head of the upper arm bone is forced out of the shoulder socket as a result of overuse or injury. Although non-surgical treatments are used, surgery is often necessary to repair torn or stretched ligaments when non-surgical methods fail to help relieve symptoms. If Dr. McLennan recommends arthroscopic surgery, he will utilize the live camera feeds to repair these soft tissues of the shoulder.

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4. What is a rotator cuff tear and can shoulder arthroscopy help?

If you are experiencing a weakness or pain when lifting or rotating your arm or lying on the affected shoulder, you may have torn your rotator cuff. Repairing a torn rotator cuff may require surgery for small and large tears. The process involves re-attaching the tendon to the head of the upper arm bone for large tears and a trimming procedure for small tears.

Arthroscopy is used to evaluate the seriousness of the damage to the rotator cuff and utilizes the live feed to strategically remove bone spurs. Once the arthroscopic portion is done, the surgeon repairs the rotator cuff directly. Common results for surgery operations include pain relief, strength improvement, and overall improvement to daily life functions.

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5. What steps should be taken prior to surgery?

Prior to consulting with Dr. McLennan to determine whether shoulder arthroscopy is the right procedure for you, consult with your primary doctor to ensure there are no medical problems that need to be addressed prior to your surgery. On the day of surgery, an anesthesiologist will discuss with you some of the options of anesthesia that are available for this type of procedure. One method of anesthesia that is commonly used for shoulder arthroscopy is to numb your shoulder and arm by injecting the solution at the base of your neck or high on your shoulder to serve as a nerve block for the operation and a pain controller for hours after the surgery. Combining nerve blocks with sedation also serves to lessen complications caused by lying in an uncomfortable position for an extended period of time during the operation.

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A Higher Standard of Orthopaedic Care: Dr. Jon G. McLennan

Jon G. McLennan, MD brings to the table his expertise of over 30 years in the field of Orthopaedic Surgery. He possesses an extraordinary eye for detail and passion in his work authoring over twenty-five peer-reviewed publications, providing insightful, educational presentations on the subjects of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, and has developed numerous surgical devices and unique techniques that have revolutionized the field. If you would like to learn more about how Dr. McLennan's care can change your life, schedule a time to speak with him at his La Quinta, CA, Palm Springs, CA, or Palm Desert, CA location or call (760) 771-4900.

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